What Almost All Sci-Fi on TV Gets Wrong

Now that the season finale of the excellent SyFy series The Expanse has come and gone, it’s a good opportunity to reflect on what makes this show so special. Hailed as the heir to the Battlestar Galactica reboot, The Expanse combines a nuanced, realistic portrayal of politics in the far future corners of the solar system. The SyFy […]

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Staff: The Forgotten Metric of Presidential Success

While the primaries consume everyone with their endlessly circular debates about policies and scandals, one aspect of a successful presidential administration gets no love. There are good reasons for this, ranging from a desire not to offend potential future networkers who can offer a job to simple ignorance about how necessary an effective bureaucracy is, but […]

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Can A Democratic Government Exist on Mars?

This post is part of an on-going series. See the other posts here. The British Interplanetary Society sat down last year in a dingy room in London and decided the U.S. Constitution and its Bill of Rights were the best documents to guide the governance of a colony on Mars. Conference delegates decide that having […]

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The Weird Thing About Green Earth by Kim Stanley Robinson

Mild spoilers for a decade-old book trilogy below, along with some slight incoherence due to sleep deprivation. Finally powered through this. Like all Kim Stanley Robinson works, the scope and detail in it are stunning; and many tropes you can expect from his writing, like a misty-eyed pastoralism about neo-paleolithic living, the technological sublime, and […]

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Christmas in Cuba

I was prepared to write about the glories of spending Christmas in the warm weather — as an avowed “cold weather person,” this is a significant growth moment for me — but it seems our own changing environment has given the entire east coast an unusually warm Christmas this year. That being said! I’m pretty […]

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MSF vs. MSF in Afghanistan and Syria

Liz Sly of the Washington Post wrote a deeply reported piece about how extensive Russia’s bombing campaign against civilians has become, and the horrible effects it is having on civilians and aid workers in the conflict. Without excusing the inexcusable U.S. strike in Kunduz, this makes for a revealing point of comparison for how human rights groups […]

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